Common MYTHS Surrounding Mental Health - The Meeting Matters
 

Common MYTHS Surrounding Mental Health - The Meeting Matters

April 24, 2023by admin0

Introduction

Similar to how vital our physical health is, so is our mental health. The brain is referred to as the coordinating and governing system in medical terminology since a healthy mind is crucial for a healthy body. Our mental health helps us be resilient, or able to handle the stresses of daily life. It also gives us inner strength, emotional wellbeing, and the ability to adjust to changes in our daily lives. Despite the importance of mental health being discussed above, it is noteworthy that Pakistan, particularly in third-world countries, suffers from a mental health crisis. 

A case study in the Daily Dawn newspaper about a Pakistani 25-year-old woman named Sakina who died as a result of physical abuse by the religious authorities (Aamil) in the city of Baden in Interior Sindh can be used to illustrate the true state of mental health in that country. Religious authorities claim that the young girl was tortured because she had a supernatural illness, which caused him to inflict misery on the spirit. There are many cases that are not recorded and perished as a result of myths and mistreatment, according to the Sakina study that was inadvertently released in the press.

Myth: Mental Health Issue Cannot Affect Me

Children as young as infants may exhibit early warning signals of mental health issues. These mental health issues can result from the interaction of  biological,psychological, and social variables and are frequently clinically diagnosable. Three-quarters of mental health illnesses start before the age of 24, and half of all mental health disorders begin before the age of 14. Unfortunately, only 50% of kids and teens with diagnosable mental health issues get the help they require. A kid can benefit from early mental health support before issues interfere with other developmental needs.

Myth: People With Mental Health Conditions Are Violent

Nobody is more likely to commit violent acts than the majority of people with mental health issues.
Only 3% to 5% of violent crimes are the fault of those who suffer from a severe mental disorder. In reality, those who suffer from serious mental illnesses are overten times more likely than the average population to become victims of violent crime. Because so many people with mental health issues are very involved and valuable members of our communities, it’s likely that you know someone who has one without even realizing it.

Myth: People with mental health needs, even those who are managing their mental health conditions, cannot tolerate the stress of holding down a job.

When their mental health is well-managed, people with mental health issues can be just as productive in the workplace as other workers. Employers frequently are unaware of an employee’s mental health conditions, but when they are, they frequently report excellent attendance and punctuality as well as motivation, quality work, and employment duration that is on par with or greater than that of other employees.

Myth: Mental health issues are a result of personality weakness or character flaws, and people can "snap out of it" if they try hard enough.

Many people require assistance to recover from mental health disorders, which have nothing to do with being sluggish or weak. There are numerous elements that affect mental health disorders, such as: biological components including genes, physical ailments, injuries, or changes in brain chemistry events in life, such trauma or a history of abuse a history of mental illness in the family. People with mental health issues can recover, and many look for rehabilitation treatment.

Myth: There is no hope for people with mental health issues. Once a friend or family member develops a mental health condition, they will never recover.

According to studies, many sufferers of mental health disorders are on the road to recovery. Recovery is the process that enables individuals to live, work, learn, and take part fully in their communities. More therapies, services, and social support networks exist today than ever before, and they are effective.

Myth: Therapy and self-help are a waste of time. Why bother when you can just take a pill?

Depending on the patient, a combination of medicine and treatment may be used to treat mental health disorders. Many people find that their healing and recovery processes go more smoothly when they collaborate with a support network.

Myth: I can't do anything for a person with a mental health issue.

Family and friends can significantly impact a situation. Only 20% of adults in 2020 had mental health treatment in the previous year, with 10% of those receiving professional counselling or therapy. The following are some ways that friends and family can help someone get the care and services they require: Getting in touch with them and letting them know you’re willing to help. Assisting
them in finding mental health resources. Encourage them to acquire self-care and coping skills. Knowing the truth about mental health is important, especially if you hear anything that isn’t accurate. Giving them the same respect you would anyone else. Use person-first language rather than diagnostic terms or descriptors like “crazy” to describe them.

Myth: It is impossible to prevent a mental health condition.

In order to reduce the likelihood that children, teens, and young adults will experience mental health issues, it is important to address identified risk factors ,such as trauma exposure. The benefits of enhancing a person’s social-emotional health include: Increased general productivity, improved educational results, decreased crime rates, more robust economies, enhanced standard of living, lengthened lifespan, greater family harmony.them in finding mental health resources. Encourage them to acquire self-care and coping skills. Knowing the truth about mental health is important, especially if you hear anything that isn’t accurate. Giving them the same respect you would anyone else. Use person-first language rather than diagnostic terms or descriptors like “crazy” to describe them.

Myth: mental health conditions are permanent

One prevalent misunderstanding about mental illness is that it is a chronic condition. While certain mental diseases may present issues for the rest of one’s life, many are treatable and manageable with the correct mix of treatments, drugs, lifestyle modifications, and social and familial support. People with mental illness can have fulfilling lives if they receive the right care. To help people who are battling with mental illness learn coping mechanisms and lessen the impact that their sickness has on their daily lives, mental health professionals can offer education and support. To ensure that they can manage their condition as well as possible, persons who are suffering from mental illness should get therapy from a trained expert. Mental illness does not have to be a lifelong problem with the correct care and support. By dispelling these myths, we can begin to foster an atmosphere of compassion and acceptance for people who are dealing with mental illness.

Myth: treatment for mental health condition is scary

The idea that therapy for mental illness can be terrifying or overpowering is one of the most widespread myths about the condition. This notion might result from both a lack of knowledge about what treatment truly includes and a deep-seated dread of the strange and unexpected. Treatment for mental health concerns, however, is frequently considerably less difficult than many people think. In reality, there are numerous treatment options that may be chosen based on the requirements and comfort level of the patient. Talk therapy, commonly referred to as psychotherapy, medicine, or a combination of the two are all possible forms of treatment for mental health problems. While medicine can be used to treat specific symptoms or illnesses, talk therapy entails sharing one’s thoughts and feelings with a mental health expert in order to acquire understanding and create coping mechanisms. Regardless of the form of therapy used, it should always involve a cooperative effort between the patient and their mental health professional in order to develop a customized plan that is most effective for them

Myth: Poor mental health is not a big issue for teenagers. They just have mood swings caused by hormonal fluctuations and act out due to a desire for attention.

The idea that therapy for mental illness can be terrifying or overpowering is one of the most widespread myths about the condition. This notion might result from both a lack of knowledge about what treatment truly includes and a deep-seated dread of the strange and unexpected. Treatment for mental health concerns, however, is frequently considerably less difficult than many people think. In reality, there are numerous treatment options that may be chosen based on the requirements and comfort level of the patient. Talk therapy, commonly referred to as psychotherapy, medicine, or a combination of the two are all possible forms of treatment for mental health problems. While medicine can be used to treat specific symptoms or illnesses, talk therapy entails sharing one’s thoughts and feelings with a mental health expert in order to acquire understanding and create coping mechanisms. Regardless of the form of therapy used, it should always involve a cooperative effort between the patient and their mental health professional in order to develop a customized plan that is most effective for them

Myth: Bad parenting causes mental conditions in adolescents.

Adolescents’ well-being and mental health, as well as that of their care givers and their relationships with them, may be impacted by a variety of variables, such as poverty, unemployment, exposure to violence, migration, and other unfavorable situations and occurrences. Adolescents from caring, nurturing homes may also struggle with mental health issues, as can adolescents from homes with supporters who may require assistance in order to maintain the best conditions for adolescent growth. With assistance, parents and other adults can play a crucial part in assisting teenagers in resolving any issues they may have.

Myth: all mental health disorders are genetic

Even the smartest scientists find it difficult to fully comprehend the large and complex topic of mental health. Although it has been established that hereditary factors play a role in conditions like bipolar disorder, depression, and schizophrenia, it would be incorrect to conclude that this is the only source of the issue. Research has been done inside families, frequently concentrating exclusively on identical twins. It’s interesting to note that frequently, just one twin is afflicted by the condition at hand. Equally, some persons receive a diagnosis while having no family history of mental illness. The only inference that can be made in light of this information is that there are numerous causes of mental disease.

Myth: some people are immune to mental health problems

You are probably more prone to experience mental illness if your family has a history of these issues frequently or if your circumstances are difficult. This does not imply that the rest of the populace is safe, though. Anybody can experience mental health problems. After a challenging or traumatic life event, such as a death in the family, an injury, or a term of unemployment, problems frequently develop. These occurrences could be bearable or they might be a trigger for more issues, depending on your personality and way of thinking. Without the right support, a little issue might develop into a serious mental disorder.

Myth: mental health is not as important as physical health

Contrary to popular assumption, there is a strong connection between mental and physical health. People with severe mental illnesses typically pass away 20 years sooner than the general population. Numerous explanations have been offered by research as to why this might happen. The first is that taking medication for a mental disorder can have negative effects on a person’s health. The likelihood that someone with serious mental illness will often check on their health is the second factor. Thirdly, because mental and physical symptoms can coexist, persons who have physical problems are frequently misdiagnosed; fourth, it has been suggested that people with mental illnesses are more inclined to adopt unhealthy dietary and lifestyle habits.

Myth: you are alone

The most comfort and assistance are frequently needed by those with mental problems. However, because of the nature of mental illness and the stigmas attached to it, those who experience it are frequently the ones who feel the most alone. We must all do what we can to help as society tries to increase awareness of mental health issues and develop a wider network of supportive services. In order to provide care and support to those who are mentally ill, organizations like Mind, Rethink, and Think Ahead are already working hard. Additionally, they are attempting to inform the public and experts about the best ways to assist those who are in need

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